A Farewell to Tweets

(It's an albatross.)

Well, I finally did it. I deleted my Twitter account. And of course, anytime a blogger deletes a social media account, they need to write a think piece about it. It’s in the terms and conditions. Continue reading

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Ten Tips for Dealing with Loneliness

Scott Pilgrim Alone in the Desert

What if your whole life you thought you were an introvert and then in your late 30s you discovered you are actually an extrovert who is just terrible at socializing? That’s what happened to me in the last year, through a combination of being dumped and then going to therapy. Now I live by myself most of the time and my primary activity is thinking about how much I don’t like that.

I have, however, learned a little bit about what works and what does not work when it comes to dealing with loneliness, so I thought I would pass along some helpful tips for other lonely people. Continue reading

Five Alternate Endings for Last Friday Morning

Last Friday morning was a difficult one. A little after nine months after separating from my wife, I finally made the soul-crushing journey down to the local circuit court to file for divorce. It was an overwhelming experience in many ways. It was expensive. The paperwork was confusing. And worst of all, it meant I could no longer be in denial that our marriage was over. Continue reading

New Year’s Resolutions for 2017

Photo by Billy Hicks. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Firework_photomontage.jpg

Any expert in making New Year’s resolutions will tell you the same thing: it is important to set attainable and measurable goals. Otherwise you are only setting yourself up for failure and the humiliation of having to admit to friends and family at the end of the year that you have accomplished nothing. With that in mind, I have worked out a set of goals for myself in the New Year that I think are both practical and modestly ambitious. Continue reading

Death or Something Like It

Last night I walked around downtown Grand Rapids, feeling like a ghost who was haunting the city. You don’t have to die to leave your life behind; people do it all the time for different reasons. You can build up an idea of who you are, what your identity is, and have it pulled out from underneath you like the tablecloth in a cheap parlor trick. You’re left suspended in air for that brief moment before—like Wile E. Coyote in a Road Runner cartoon—you realize with horror that you’ve been defying the laws of physics. Then when you finally hit the ground, it doesn’t feel like you’ll ever get back up. Continue reading